A new direction for Midwest Energy News

Dan Haugen, stellar reporter and all-around nice guy.

When Midwest Energy News launched back in March 2010, it was an aggregation-only news portal. And while the region’s news organizations generally do a good job reporting on energy issues, it didn’t take long to realize that there’s a need for deeper, broader and more thorough coverage.

In December, we started this blog, and in January, we published our first piece of enterprise reporting. In the months that followed, we’ve become as much a destination for this original work as for our daily headline roundup.

Starting next week, we’re expanding our reporting capabilities. Dan Haugen, a Minneapolis freelancer and frequent contributor to Midwest Energy News, will begin our first Energy Journalism Fellowship. Dan will be producing regular features as well as offering regular insight and analysis. He’s a top-notch reporter and we’re grateful to have his help.

Dan will write about issues throughout the region, but over time and as funding allows, we hope to contract with additional reporters to cover individual states, as well as write about specific subject areas.

Midwest Energy News‘ original journalism is funded entirely by foundations and individual donations (every little bit helps!). You can read more about us here.

And while we’ll be focusing more on original work (and eventually redesigning the site), the daily aggregated report will still be a priority, and we’ll continue sending out the email digest at 11 a.m. sharp each day.

If you like what we do, here are some ways you can help out:

And, as always, thanks for reading.

One thought on “A new direction for Midwest Energy News

  1. I’d like to see more articles expounding on the reason and method of SREC’s. I feel more states need to adopt the SREC trading programs, since it does not deplete state budgets because it deals with carbon payments made by carbon producers, primarily Ute’s. Right now, they make the payments, but it goes back to their own RE and wind programs. More states have solar available, and more solar heating and electricity could be incentivised thru the SREC program by the payment of solar credits for energy production rather than incentivising “gold standard hardware” which makes solar energy gathering more expensive for more people.