Another solar cease-fire, this time in Arizona

SOLAR: Lawmakers and solar backers in Arizona agree to drop competing ballot measures and work on a compromise on solar incentives. (Arizona Republic)

ALSO:
• Maine lawmakers push to override Gov. Paul LePage's veto of a solar bill; the governor sought lower rates for net metering. (PV Magazine, Portland Press Herald)
• A Nevada panel, including utility and solar representatives, agree that existing solar customers should be grandfathered in to their existing rates. (Las Vegas Sun)
• A bipartisan group of Iowa lawmakers are pushing back against two utilities' efforts to increase rates on solar customers. (Midwest Energy News) 
• SunEdison's bankruptcy doesn't have the same "symbolic value" that Solyndra's bankruptcy did five years ago, experts say.

Can Wyoming’s ‘moon shot’ save the state’s coal industry?

COAL: Wyoming embarks on its "moon shot" to save the state's coal industry – a $21 million carbon-capture research facility near Gillette. (Casper Star-Tribune)

CLEAN POWER PLAN: The Supreme Court's stay of the rules in February has not deterred states from moving forward with carbon-reduction strategies. (ClimateWire)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join Greentech Media at Solar Summit for over two days of unrivaled networking opportunities and innovative, engaging panel sessions that will provide a unique mix of market intelligence and coordination among industry players. To get 10% off your registration, use our code: MWENERGY10***

CONGRESS: Democrats say a "poison pill" amendment related to Iran could scuttle a bipartisan energy bill. (The Hill)

CLIMATE:
• California Sen. Barbara Boxer introduces a bill that would authorize the Treasury to issue "Climate Change Bonds" to fund infrastructure projects. (Los Angeles Times)
• Stanford University, once praised by activists for divesting from coal, is criticized for not doing the same for oil and gas.

Vermont utility seeks to share space with energy entrepreneurs

CONGRESS: The U.S. House and Senate "still have miles to go" in reconciling differences in the versions of energy bills passed out of each chamber. (E&E Daily)

UTILITIES:
• A Vermont utility is seeking energy entrepreneurs to co-locate at its headquarters. (Renewable Energy World)
• The Sierra Club sues to block an Arizona utility's plan to convert a coal plant to natural gas, saying as planned the plant's operations would result in higher emissions. (Arizona Republic)

***SPONSORED LINK: The 2016 Midwest Solar Expo, May 17-19 in Minnesota, is now co-located with the inaugural Midwest Energy Storage Symposium (May 19 only). Join the conversation on building robust energy storage markets across the Midwest and practical business applications for solar companies.

World leaders gather to sign historic climate agreement

CLIMATE: As world leaders gather to sign the Paris climate agreement, experts warn more aggressive action is needed. (New York Times)

ALSO:
• UN members express concern about "sabotage inside the United States" against the agreement. (Reuters)
• The inaugural meeting of the bipartisan congressional Climate Solutions Caucus was a "good first date," though no firm commitments on policy were made. (E&E Daily)

***SPONSORED LINK: Don’t miss the action-packed 2016 Midwest Solar Expo, May 17-19 in Minnesota. Gain the latest industry insights and trends and network with hundreds of decision-makers from leading solar companies.

First major energy bill since 2007 passes Senate

CONGRESS:
• The Senate passes the Energy Policy Modernization Act, the first significant federal energy bill since 2007; the bill still faces opposition in the House. (New York Times, Greenwire)
• Electricity generated from biomass plants would be considered a carbon-neutral, renewable source under the bill. (Climate Progress)

CLIMATE:
• 160 countries, including the United States, are expected to sign the Paris Agreement on climate change tomorrow. (Associated Press, The Hill)
• Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz says action on climate change "is going a lot faster than many had expected." (Christian Science Monitor)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join Greentech Media at Solar Summit for over two days of unrivaled networking opportunities and innovative, engaging panel sessions that will provide a unique mix of market intelligence and coordination among industry players. To get 10% off your registration, use our code: MWENERGY10***

SOLAR:
• An industry group estimates the U.S. has surpassed one million solar installations.

Supreme Court strikes down Maryland power plant subsidies

UTILITIES:
• The U.S. Supreme Court rules against Maryland's program to subsidize new natural gas plants, saying it interferes with federal authority to regulate rates. (Bloomberg)
• The decision could have broader implications on other cases, including Ohio utilities' efforts to guarantee incomes for some power plants. (Columbus Dispatch)

CONGRESS: The Senate is expected to vote soon on a bipartisan energy bill that includes provision to promote storage and grid modernization. (Washington Post)

***SPONSORED LINK: Don’t miss the action-packed 2016 Midwest Solar Expo, May 17-19 in Minnesota. Gain the latest industry insights and trends and network with hundreds of decision-makers from leading solar companies.

Senate breaks logjam on bipartisan energy bill

CONGRESS: The U.S. Senate hopes to wrap up work on a sweeping, bipartisan energy bill this week. (E&E Daily)

CLEAN POWER PLAN:
• Backers of a plan to extend a freeze of Ohio's clean energy standards for three more years say it's due to the legal uncertainty around the federal Clean Power Plan. (Midwest Energy News)
• Groups challenging the Clean Power Plan in federal court say the U.S. EPA is downplaying its "radical" approach to power plant regulation. (EnergyWire)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join Greentech Media at Solar Summit for over two days of unrivaled networking opportunities and innovative, engaging panel sessions that will provide a unique mix of market intelligence and coordination among industry players. To get 10% off your registration, use our code: MWENERGY10***

CLIMATE: An administrative law judge in Minnesota recommends that the state use updated cost-of-carbon estimates that factor in health and societal costs. (Minnesota Public Radio)

SOLAR:
• Solar still has economic obstacles to overcome before it becomes the world's dominant electricity source.

Failed oil agreement may send prices plunging again

OIL AND GAS: Oil prices will likely fall again after a meeting of 18 nations fails to reach an agreement to freeze production. (New York Times)

ALSO:
• U.S. natural gas production set a record in 2015 despite falling prices. (Houston Chronicle)
• A drilling company challenges the rejection of a federal lease in Montana over tribal concerns. (Associated Press)
• Developers scrap plans for a $6 billion export terminal in Oregon. (Daily Astorian)
• Wyoming officials move to plug a company's wells after it fails to follow through with cleanup orders.

Midwest utilities retired 2,000 MW of coal last week

COAL: The last of Michigan's "Classic 7" coal plants shuts down after 67 years of operation. (MLive)

ALSO:
• Utilities in Michigan and Indiana retired 2,000 MW of coal generation last week. (Platts)
• Retirement of an Indiana plant is "almost like a divorce" for longtime employees. (Indianapolis Star)
• Wind and natural gas challenge the economics of North Dakota coal plants. (Bismarck Tribune)

***SPONSORED LINK: Don’t miss the action-packed 2016 Midwest Solar Expo, May 17-19 in Minnesota.

Experts: Markets, not regulation, drove Peabody bankruptcy

COAL: Financial experts say cheap natural gas and an oversupplied market of inexpensive coal were the primary drivers of Peabody's bankruptcy — not environmental regulations. (ClimateWire)

ALSO:
• Environmental groups hope Peabody's bankruptcy will hasten the transition from coal to renewables. (MarketWatch)
• "Right-sizing" will be the next step for the coal industry. (EnergyWire)
• Montana officials will continue studying potential impacts from a proposed coal mine even though developers have suspended the project. (Associated Press)
• Leaders in Wyoming hope technology can save the state's coal industry.