Daily Digest

Dakota Access developer claims initial pipeline route would have impacted minorities more

RENEWABLES: In search of lower prices and more renewables, some municipal utilities in Nebraska are ending power-purchasing contracts with the state’s largest utility. (Midwest Energy News)

SOLAR:
• Ohio is among coal-dependent states where industry jobs are being displaced by solar jobs. (The Intelligencer/Wheeling News-Register)
• Iowa sees 61 percent growth in the number of solar jobs in the state over the past two years. (Radio Iowa)
• Minnesota-based Red Wing Shoe Co. plans to use two solar gardens to offset nearly a quarter of the company’s energy use. (Red Wing Republican Eagle)

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PIPELINES:
• A confidential Dakota Access pipeline memo shows the developer claiming the original proposed path north of Bismarck would have impacted minority communities more than a route through Standing Rock reservation. (InsideClimate News)
• U.S. Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota wants the FBI to explain why federal anti-terrorism law enforcement officers are investigating Dakota Access pipeline protesters. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
• A United Nations official who visited North Dakota believes Native Americans’ concerns about the Dakota Access pipeline have not been properly addressed. (Associated Press)
• The Dakota Access developer is seeking to shield documents from the public about spill response plans and other pipeline features that could be targeted by anti-pipeline activists. (Associated Press)
• The Trump administration says U.S.-made steel will not be required to construct the Keystone XL pipeline, though the order will apply to new and maintenance pipeline projects. (Bloomberg)

BIOGAS: A Wisconsin university isn’t seeing the payoff after investing in anaerobic digesters. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

OIL AND GAS:
• In Ohio, natural gas plants “are sprouting and are helping to render coal and nuclear power plants noncompetitive.” (Toledo Blade)
• The proposed 830-mile Rover gas pipeline receives water quality certification for construction in 18 counties from Ohio’s environmental agency. (Toledo Blade)
• Anticipating growth in horizontal fracturing, an Ohio agency streamlines the permitting process for new compressor stations. (Toledo Blade)

BIOFUELS: U.S. ethanol producers respond with an “unprecedented display of public disunity” as plans surface about changing the way the industry is regulated. (Bloomberg)

COAL:
• Retired coal miners in southern Illinois who voted for President Trump hope he returns the favor by protecting their health care and pension benefits. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
• An Ohio utility’s plan to close two coal plants in the southern part of the state has local officials on edge about the economic implications. (Dayton Daily News)

EMISSIONS: U.S. automakers are expected to reach an agreement with the Trump administration over rolling back emissions requirements for new cars and trucks. (New York Times)

COMMENTARY:
• An Illinois advocacy group says legislation signed by lawmakers last year puts the state on a path to lead on clean energy. (State Journal-Register)
• An Ohio editorial board says the U.S. “has an obligation” to ensure retired coal miners received pension and health care benefits they were promised. (Ashtabula Star Beacon)
• The St. Cloud Times in Minnesota weighs the benefits and drawbacks of granting Xcel Energy approval to bypass the regulatory process and replace coal-fired units with a major natural gas plant.
Crain’s Cleveland Business says Ohio lawmakers should “proceed with caution” when it comes to FirstEnergy’s request for zero-emissions credits for its nuclear plants.

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