U.S. Energy News

Nevada’s net-metering law could serve as national model

SOLAR: A law that reinstates net metering for residential solar customers in Nevada is the first time in U.S. history that consumers have been legally guaranteed the right to self-generate electricity, and it could serve as a national model. (Greentech Media, E&E News)

ALSO:
• For the first time ever, Virginia now has more jobs in the solar industry than the coal industry. (WVTF)
• Florida’s governor signs a bill implementing voter-approved tax breaks for solar. (News Chief)

WIND: Federal regulators refuse to kill a transmission fee that inflates the cost of wind energy. (Billings Gazette)

RENEWABLES:
• A host of new companies are investing in clean energy. (Greentech Media)
• Wind and solar accounted for 24 percent of Colorado’s energy generation in March, according to a new report. (Denver Post)

POLICY: A tariff for wholesale distributed energy generation in California is no longer working, but clean energy advocates say a few easy tweaks by regulators could fix the problem. (Greentech Media)

EPA:
• EPA chief Scott Pruitt had a series of meetings with fossil fuel leaders during his first six weeks in office, according to newly released details of his schedule. (Bloomberg)
• A new report says the EPA’s STAR research program “may reduce the cost of regulations, protect public health, and save lives,” but the Trump administration wants to eliminate it. (Washington Post)

REGULATION: Advocates say new regulatory changes in Michigan will pave the way for more distributed generation owned by independent producers. (Midwest Energy News)

CLIMATE: Over 170 House Democrats are pushing for a nonbinding resolution to condemn President Trump’s decision to exit the Paris climate accord. (The Hill)

UTILITIES:
• A holistic planning process for distributed energy resources in Sacramento, California, could set new standard for utilities. (Utility Dive)
• In a weekly podcast, utility industry leaders talk about the greatest challenges they face. (Greentech Media)

OIL & GAS:
• Texas lawmakers order state regulators to post oil company penalties and complaints online. (Houston Chronicle)
• California’s electricity grid operator will conduct a study of clean energy alternatives to replace a natural gas plant in Ventura County following complaints from residents. (Los Angeles Times)

PIPELINES:
• The Sabal Trail natural gas pipeline that runs through Alabama, Georgia and Florida will be partially in use in the coming days and should be fully operational by the end of the month. (Associated Press)
• A judge won’t allow President Trump to be added as a defendant in a lawsuit over the Dakota Access Pipeline. (Associated Press)

COAL ASH: North Carolina lawmakers are considering legislation that would ease new requirements on Duke Energy to find environmentally safe recycling uses for coal ash from some of its plants. (Charlotte Business Journal)

COMMENTARY:
• Residential solar installers shouldn’t try to scale nationally because it’s costly and difficult to adjust to local market requirements, says a senior solar analyst at GTM Research. (Greentech Media)
• An industry spokesperson says fracking has been an economic boon for Ohio. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

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